HUICHICA EAST

((folkYEAH!))) Jeff Bundschu and Sarah Lyons Chase present

HUICHICA EAST

Real Estate, Charles Bradley & His Extraordinaires, Cass McCombs Band, Marissa Nadler, Doug Tuttle, The Mattson 2, Meg Baird, Mail The Horse, Surf Curse, MV & EE, John Andrews & The Yawns, Cut Worms, Willy Mason, Currituck Co., Driftwood Soldier, Ruth Garbus, Ard

Fri · August 25, 2017 - Sat · August 26, 2017

Doors: 1:00 pm / Show: 2:00 pm

$10.00 - $90.00

This event is all ages

(((folkYEAH!))) Jeff Bundschu and Sarah Lyons Chase present HUICHICA EAST @  CHASEHOLM FARM- 115 CHASE ROAD, PINE PLAINS, NY

Friday 8/25: Doors 2pm, Show 3pm

Saturday 8/26: Doors 11am, Show 11:30am

Featuring Farm Grown Food From Chaseholm Farms and Estate Wines From Gundlach Bundschu Winery, Sonoma CA, & Tasty Suds From Lagunitas

No outside food, or coolers or high back chairs.

Families Welcome!  Kids Under 16 Free when accompanied by an adult.

 

 

HUICHICA EAST
Real Estate
Real Estate
In Mind, the fourth full-length record from Real Estate, is a portrait of a mature band at the height of its power. Long respected for their deft lyrical hand and gorgeous melodies, In Mind builds upon the band’s reputation for crafting perfect songs and carries Real Estate even deeper into the pantheon of great songwriters.
On the new record, the band fine-tunes the winsome songwriting and profound earnestness that made previous albums—2009’s Real Estate, 2011’s Days, and 2014’s Atlas—so beloved, and pushes their songs in a variety of compelling new directions. Written primarily by guitarist and vocalist Martin Courtney at his home in Beacon—a quiet town in upstate New York—In Mind offers a shifting of the gears, positing a band engaged in the push/pull of burgeoning adulthood. Reflecting a change in lineup, changes in geography, and a general desire to move forward without looking back, the record casts the band in a new light—one that replaces the wistful ennui of teenage suburbia with an equally complicated adult version. The record not only showcases some of the band’s most sublime arrangements to date, it also presents a leap forward in terms of production, with the band utilizing the studio as a tool to broaden the sonic landscape of their music to stunning effect.
In Mind offers passing nods to the sanguine qualities of earlier releases while also depicting a band in a state of real change. Since the recording of the band’s last album, Courtney had become a father of two and settled into a newfound domesticity living in Beacon, while bassist Alex Bleeker made the move out to sunny California, creating a complicated new set of logistics for the band to work around. Additionally, after the departure of founding member and lead guitarist Matt Mondanile in 2015, the band—Courtney, Bleeker, and drummer Jackson Pollis—faced the prospect of either closing ranks or embracing the changes that bringing in new people would ultimately bring. “It just seemed like a good moment to move in a slightly different direction,” says Courtney, “The idea of bringing in a stranger seemed too weird, but I wasn’t interested in recording as a four-piece and having some hired gun come out to play shows with us. In the end asking Julian Lynch—who we’d already been playing with and we’ve known since high school—to join the band made the most sense. He felt like a full-time member of the band already.” This was also true of keyboardist Matt Kallman, who previously played with the band on Atlas and on that record’s subsequent tour. Joining the band in a more official capacity before the recording of In Mind, Kallman contributed in both sound and scope, writing the keyboard parts and contributing to the album’s arrangements. With a new lineup secured and armed with an arsenal of songs that Courtney and Bleeker had spent the past six months writing, the band approached the business of fleshing out the songs in an almost workmanlike manner.
“It was good being outside of the city,” recalls Kallman. “We got a little Airbnb in Beacon and we rented a practice space inside an old converted high school. We would walk to the high school and play music all day, then go play basketball, go to the health food store or go out to dinner, then go back to the house. We did that every day for, in total, about three weeks. It was nice not having the headache of our regular lives. It all felt very open, like we were planted there to do a job and that’s all we could do was just work on the songs. I think the music kind of reflects that space we were in—free and open and cautiously optimistic.”
Recorded in Los Angeles with producer Cole M.G.N. (known for his work with the likes of Beck, Snoop Dogg, Dam-Funk, Nx Worries, and Julia Holter), the eleven tracks on In Mind deliver the same kind of warmth and soft-focus narratives that one has come to expect from the band—pastoral guitars, elegantly deployed arrangements, a sort of mindful melancholy—but there is also a newly adventurous sonic edge to the proceedings. Album opener—the ebullient pop number “Darling” — announces itself with a wash of synth tones rather than guitars. Elsewhere, on tracks like “Serve the Song” and “Two Arrows,” guitarist Julian Lynch employs a variety of distorted guitar sounds that might have felt out of place on previous Real Estate records, with the latter track stretching out beyond the six-minute mark—the closest thing to a jam the band has ever recorded. The band’s predilection for crafting airtight pop songs remains in full-effect here, with songs like “Stained Glass” and “Same Sun” occupying the same kind of rarefied universe as fan favorites like “Talking Backwards” or “It’s Real.” ‘Where does one thing ever end and the next begin?’ Courtney asks in the latter, ‘I do not wish to retrace the steps I’ve taken / All that matters now is where I’m going.’
Glittering pop moments aside, the record’s most stunning moments are arguably it’s most restrained— “After the Moon” unspools in waltz-like fashion, while album closer “Saturday” offers In Mind’s most pointed take on moving beyond the fascinations of youth: ‘When a stranger is living in your old house / What does where you were born still say about you? / It’d be best to jettison what you can’t redo.’
Perhaps more than on any other Real Estate record, the lyrics on In Mind seem to reflect a struggle between youth and adulthood, the desire for escapism balanced against the increasing demands of responsibility. (‘There’s no place I would rather be right now,’ sings Courtney on “Stained Glass”, ‘I’d love to never leave but I just don’t know how.’) “I feel like it takes touring a record for a few months and playing the songs over and over for me to really start understanding my own lyrics,” says Courtney, “but so much of this record feels like it has to do with my concerns about taking care of my family. I will often walk my wife and kids to the library and then just go out on my own, wandering around the town for three or four hours and writing the lyrics in my head.” Courtney continues, “We certainly never thought this would be our lives, but now that it is, we all want to protect that and nourish it and keep it safe. I think maybe that’s what this record is about.”
As for the band’s increasingly widespread appeal, both bassist Alex Bleeker and Courtney can only theorize as to what it is about their music that seems to strike such a profound chord with listeners. “I think there’s an earnestness to what we do,” says Bleeker. “It’s coming from a truthful place of human experience, but it’s also kind of raw. It evokes something for people, even though we are often dissecting subject matter that seems super normal and undramatic, it’s also relatable. We all grew up with this common, cookie-cutter kind of American suburban experience and we can’t help but write about that. I think there aren’t a lot of people who actually write about that in a very forthright way.”
Per bassist Alex Bleeker, the songs on In Mind reflect a kind of quiet ambition on the part of the band. A desire not to reinvent themselves, but rather to just be the best version of themselves that they can be. “We’re never looking to overhaul anything in a huge way,” he says, “But we do want to grow and explore new territory and use the studio in a different way. We didn’t want to change anything arbitrarily, but it felt good to reach out into some more exploratory space while still holding on to what makes us Real Estate in the first place.”
Charles Bradley & His Extraordinaires
Charles Bradley & His Extraordinaires
Charles Bradley has made a name for himself as a riveting live performer and was named to the top spot on Paste Magazine’s Best Live Acts of 2015. He has taken his show to venues and festivals across the globe including Coachella, Glastonbury Festival and Primavera Sound. The Brooklyn-based 67-year old will release his third album Changes on April 1 via Daptone Records, which Rolling Stone calls one of the “Most Anticipated Albums of 2016.” The remarkable against-all-odds rise of Charles Bradley since the release of his 2011 debut album No Time For Dreaming has been well documented. He transcended a bleak life on the streets and struggled through a series of ill-fitting jobs before finally being discovered by Daptone's Gabriel Roth. The year following the release of No Time For Dreaming was one triumph after another including a breakthrough performance at SXSW, several television performances and having the album named to many year end “best of” lists. The soul singer’s ascent continued with the 2013 release of his triumphant second album Victim of Love, which saw Bradley emerging from his past heartaches stronger and more confident, overflowing with love to share.
Cass McCombs Band
Cass McCombs Band
Over the past decade, Cass McCombs has established himself as one of our premier songwriters. It’s a career that has twisted and turned, from style to subject, both between records and within them. Diverse, cryptic, vital and refreshingly rebellious — just when you think you have him pinned down, you find you’re on the wrong track.

However, Mangy Love, his Anti Records debut, is McCombs at his most blunt: tackling sociopolitical issues through his uniquely cracked lens of lyrical wit and singular insight.

McCombs uses himself as a mirror to misguided and confounding realities, confronting them head-on: “Rancid Girl” reads like a ZZ Top study in Kardashian politics, “Run Sister Run” a mantra for a misogynistic justice system, “Bum Bum Bum” displays a racist, elitist government through the allegory of sadistic dog breeding; the album is sewn together by a common thread of ‘opposition,’ most directly articulated in “Opposite House”, with allusions to mental illness. ‘Laughter Is The Best Medicine’ provides a possible recipe for healing, with the help of an authentic medicine man, the legendary Rev. Goat Carson. The severity of his lyrics is contrasted by the music, which ventures into groovy realms of Philly soul, Norcal psychedelia and New York paranoia punk, articulating the spontaneity and joy of his live show better than ever before.

The record is unquestionably a work of great studio aptitude: a carefully arranged, high-fidelity production by veteran Rob Schnapf and Dan Horne. And as usual, McCombs is joined by many notable members of his eclectic musical tribe, whose names are proudly displayed on the back cover.

Mostly written during a bitter New York City winter and while travelling in Ireland, Mangy Love is Cass at the top of his game, reaching new sonic heights, creatively evolving lyrically, and resulting in his most provocative and complete record yet.
Marissa Nadler
Marissa Nadler
For more than 12 years, Marissa Nadler has perfected her own take on the exquisitely sculpted gothic American songform. On her seventh full-length, Strangers, she has shed any self-imposed restrictions her earlier albums adhered to, stepped through a looking glass, and created a truly monumental work.

In the three years since 2014’s elegiac, autobiographical July, Nadler has reconciled the heartbreak so often a catalyst for her songwriting. Turning her writing to more universal themes, Nadler dives deep into a surreal, apocalyptic dreamscape. Her lyrics touch upon the loneliness and despair of the characters that inhabit them. These muses are primal, fractured, disillusioned, delicate, and alone. They are the unified voice of this record, the titular “strangers.”
Doug Tuttle
Doug Tuttle
New Hampshire-native Doug Tuttle (ex-MMOSS) has been perfecting his signature brand of zoned-out, winsome jangle for nigh on a decade, first as one of the primary songwriters in New Hampshire psychedelic band MMOSS & now as a solo artist. His eponymous debut was released in 2013 by Trouble In Mind Records, who will release the follow-up "It Calls On Me" in February of 2016.

Eschewing the jittery, love-lorn anxiety of his first solo outing, "It Calls On Me" presents a decidedly more dreamy journey through softer, sun-burnt landscapes, while still showcasing Tuttle's trademark masterful guitar-work and his very own brand of impeccably-crafted, fractured psychedelic pop.

Written in 2014-2015 in Somerville, MA, It Calls On Me hints at the skewed, wide-eyed '60s folk-pop of Lazy Smoke or Ithaca's, mysterious, fulgent Brit-folk rock, and the zoned '70s soft-rock of 10cc and Bread, neatly winding in and out through Tuttle's panoply of hallucinatory effects, buzzes, and unshakably haunting harmonics to create a richly-textured album of sonic jewels.

Opener "A Place for You" is a rumpled, upbeat, almost solely acoustic jam, featuring Tuttle's winding, sinewy guitar rambles and vocals like well-worn corduroy.

Title-track "It Calls On Me" is a tightly-wound propulsive rocker, recalling his debut's slightly unhinged urgency with a pliant, rubbery, Richard Thompson-esque guitar solo that branches out like plant-growth.

"Make Good Time" is a gorgeous, intimately-crafted gem that gently shimmers with Byrds-ian 12-string against pastoral vocal harmonies and hazy, mellotron strings and flute.

Other key tracks include "Painted Eye," an epic, disorienting stunner that recalls the blurry stupor of '70s West Coast soft rock with a guitar solo needling amidst queasy, bent strings, and "Falling to Believe," a catchy ear-worm that pairs Tuttle's soft, hushed vocals with some seriously heat-blistered guitar-work.

Most reminiscent of his most trance-inducing work with MMOSS, "On Your Way" is an eerie, stately, almost trad-folk dirge that carries all the pageantry of Fairport Convention, backed by brittle, Fables of the Reconstruction-era R.E.M. guitar jangle amongst a tightly-woven tapestry of voices.

"It Calls On Me" shows Tuttle relaxing into his role as a memorable, compelling songwriter, eager to showcase his storehouse of harmonies and dissonances, and delighting in the more fragile and intimate aspects of frayed-at-the-edges song-creation. As a result, this record feels more like a blissful letting go rather than a giving in, allowing the flashing sunlight to create patterns across your closed eyelids as you drive a winding road through a forest of trees.

RIYL: Kurt Vile, Solar Motel Band, Steve Gunn, Gun Outfit, Gene Clark, Byrds, Fairport Convention
The Mattson 2
The Mattson 2
If you could soundtrack the jangle of the sea and the jazz of the surf, The Mattson 2 would most certainly be the composers. The identical twin's deep telepathic kinship navigates colorful forms of beautiful weirdness and exotic landscapes of layered improvisation. The duo shimmers and shakes with the soaring modern wizardry of Jared Mattson's untamed, layered guitars and Jonathan's tribal jazz hard-bop drumming. They've toured Japan, Brazil, France, Spain, Portugal, Denmark, Finland, The Netherlands, and the United States. Collaborations include Thomas Campbell, Ray Barbee, Tommy Guerrero, Cornelius, Chocolat & Akito Katayose, Money Mark (Beastie Boys), Toro Y Moi, and Tortoise members Johnny Herndon, John McEntire, and Jeff Parker.
Meg Baird
Meg Baird
Meg Baird is an American musician originally from New Jersey and currently based in San Francisco, California after having established her musical career in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She is known as a founding member and lead female vocalist for the Philadelphia folk rock band Espers. In 2007, she released her first solo LP Dear Companion on Drag City. She also plays with sister Laura in The Baird Sisters, and between 2009 and 2012 played drums for Philadelphia punk band Watery Love.
As a solo artist, she has toured with many noted fingerstyle guitarists, including Bert Jansch, James Blackshaw, Micah Blue Smaldone, Michael Chapman, Glenn Jones, Michael Hurley, and Jack Rose.
Her vocal style has often been compared to that of Fairport Convention's Sandy Denny and Pentangle's Jacqui McShee, although she has herself cited Celia Humphris of Trees as the more personally influential member of the 1960s and 70's UK folk scene.
Mail The Horse
Mail The Horse
Mail the Horse is a country clunker of a five-piece careening down a highway laid to waste with Stones psychedelia and heartbroken hymnals, the tailpipe stuffed with marigolds. Recorded with Hunter Davidsohn (Porches, Frankie Cosmos) at Business District Recording in Western New York, their new EP, Magnolia (out June 10) channels the vibes of mid to late 70s Stones and elements of Springsteen.

The album’s sonic resonance with the rock Gods of the past should come as no surprise to anyone who has seen Mail the Horse live. Their songs simmer with a sincerity and twang that has blown the doors off of basements in Brooklyn and captivated crowds at festivals across the country. Their pedal steel player slinks through the tunes while the band's two crooners belt out anthems and spellbinding harmonies with a casual gaze.

Born in a basement apartment known affectionately as the Gates Motel on Gates Avenue in Bushwick, Mail the Horse has been playing the kind of rock and roll that makes lady-mullets stand on end since 2010 and are set to explode into the summer of 2016. Magnolia is the strike-anywhere match brushing seductively along the dusty edges of the powder keg.
Surf Curse
Surf Curse
MV & EE
MV & EE
"Some people have a hard time picking sides, not me, not here: I'll take the flip. It starts high on the crazy horse, all gallop and fuzz, and begins to fray in the most glorious way. When the tambourine starts to shake, the jam goes to shambles — they coulda let it in, coulda make some rock heroism out of it, but they let it soak, standing outside, staring through the window as the storm rages on. It's one of those moments that makes it real clear why MV&EE end up on bills with boundary pushers as often as mellow jammers. Of course, matt and erika being who they are and doing what they do, bring it back home, nice and comfortable like a loaned drug rug on a cold night, with some song stylings that showcase finger picking and ghostly harmonies and that inimitable siren's wail of EE's slide." - peter meehan/lucky peach

"MV & EE, a Vermont-based trance-folk troupe led by singer-writers Matt Valentine and Erika Elder. The collective makes a loose psychedelia that seems at times on the verge of blissful collapse: soupy-fuzz guitars, fertility-rite boogie and dislocated harmonies that, combined, sound like an iridescent-woodland powwow...the pastoral drone and vocal om will, with time and exposure, feel like shelter from your storms." - david fricke/rolling stone
John Andrews & The Yawns
John Andrews & The Yawns
hroughout his years of traveling, John Andrews has documented his life with his home recordings. His first record, Bit By The Fang, found him living in the amish country of Lancaster, PA. His latest record, Bad Posture finds him waving farewell to Pennsylvania & greeting the wooded hills of Barrington, NH. Sitting on top of one of these hills, coined Mt. Misery, is the colonial era farmhouse John now calls his home. This is where Bad Posture was born.

The songs were written slowly & quietly throughout the winter, usually late at night next to the wood stove for warmth. It was recorded in his barn with the doors ajar, welcoming the springtime. The humble recording gear invites the outside noises in. You can hear the crickets chirping with the occasional truck driving by. The songs themselves lend their hand like slow backwoods Beatles demos covered in a thin blanket of tape hiss. John’s voice lulls us in an earthy calmness as he sits hunched like a scarecrow over the piano.

Andrews’ band, The Yawns, has been crystallized with staples from the New England freak scene; Rachel Neveu & Lukas Goudreault (MMOSS/Soft Eyes) & Joey Schneider. All of who have been playing up in the free country for many years themselves and all of who call the same farmhouse home.

Over the past few years John has played as a session player on records by Woods, Widowspeak, EZTV & Kevin Morby as well as composing & recording with his band Quilt. Yet, the piano compositions on Bad Posture place him as a stand-out voice with this instrument. There are guitar-bands working in a similar territory as Andrews’, yet the focus on keys in many of the songs give the album a different temperament and a unique place amidst his peers. Windmill, Homesick In Heaven & Old News are three of the album cuts that boast this specific sense of multi-instrumentality. They wink at you with a Workingman’s Dead smile. The opener and lead-single, Drivers, showcases an older & wiser Andrews’ coming to terms with a new-found independence, the overdriven guitar echoing his home-state’s slogan, live free or die. “I don’t owe you no more.” Andrews hums.

Bad Posture was mixed with headphones at the foot of Emma Critchett’s grave, who lived in the Yawns’ house during the 1800’s. The record is an ode to her & all who have lived in this house. It also paints a picture of what it feels like to live in the “free-country” on the precipice of a rapidly changing political climate. Some folks go back to the woods to escape the harsh-realities of contemporary society, for Andrews it seems like he is diving head first into nature’s unknown, searching for love in the tundras of seclusion. When the cities become boring, we hop in our vehicles and drive to those places that are always beaming with newness. Bad Posture contains the anthems that will hold us over til’ we arrive.” – Shane Butler
Cut Worms
Cut Worms
Cut Worms is the nom de plume of Max Clarke, assumed while studying illustration at Chicago's Columbia College. Relocating to New York City in October 2015 shortly after releasing a collection of demos via Chicago's Dumpster Tapes, Cut Worms soon began generating tremendous buzz with the stark, timeless honesty of the demo recordings as well as incomparable live performances, showcasing a powerful vocal talent equally compelling for its vulnerability, that calls to mind greats like The Everly Brothers, Harry Nilsson, and Buddy Holly. Cut Worms spent 2016 supporting dates with The Growlers, Foxygen, Steve Gunn, Jessica Pratt, and more, quickly becoming an opening act of choice in New York City, while preparing a forthcoming debut LP.
Willy Mason
Willy Mason
With a sound that recalls Bob Dylan and Johnny Cash along with the cynicism of grunge and punk, nobody could believe wry singer/songwriter Willy Mason was only 19 when he appeared on the indie scene. Born and raised on Martha's Vineyard, Mason grew up with his parents' love of folk music. He loved it, too, but his teen years brought Nirvana and Rage Against the Machine into his life. Mason found their political and social messages much easier to identify with and soon combined folk's softer and looser delivery with the revolutionary attitude of his new heroes. Writing came easy now and the teenager had plenty of self-penned material ready when a family friend asked him to appear on his local radio show. As luck would have it, Sean Foley -- an associate of Conor Oberst and his band, Bright Eyes -- was driving through Cape Cod as Mason was on the air. Foley was captivated by Mason's song "Oxygen" and left his phone number at the radio station, setting off a chain of events that would have Oberst and Mason hanging out, doing gigs together, and touring America. With only three people in the audience, a gig at the South by Southwest festival in Austin, Texas seemed a disaster until one of the three introduced himself as BBC DJ Zane Lowe. Lowe was also captivated by "Oxygen" and added it to his playlist when it appeared on Mason's debut, Where the Humans Eat, released by Team Love in 2004. Critics were positive about the album and unanimously shocked that the literate writer and performer of these songs was only 19. Tours with Rosanne Cash, My Morning Jacket, Evan Dando, Beth Orton, and labelmates Jenny Lewis & the Watson Twins increased the fan base and influenced the Astralwerks label to pick up the debut. Astralwerks reissued Where the Humans Eat in early 2006 with bonus tracks and videos added to the original album. That same year Mason assembled a band that included Nina Violet and cousin Zak Borden, and in 2007 his sophomore record, If the Ocean Gets Rough, came out, while a live set at the Austin City Limits festival soon followed. By 2008, two world tours had taken their toll and Mason sought respite back on Martha's Vineyard, only occasionally venturing further afield to play live. He returned to the public eye in 2012 with Carry On, an album produced in south London by Dan Carey which incorporated the use of digital rhythm tracks and electric guitars. ~ David Jeffries
Currituck Co.
Currituck Co.
Currituck Co. is Kevin Barker and friends. He plays in the indie band Aden, as well as helping out with a cavalcade of other musical acts including Antony and the Johnsons, The Essex Green, Hercules and Love Affair, The Ladybug Transistor, Vashti Bunyan, Vetiver.
Driftwood Soldier
Driftwood Soldier
Owen Lyman-Schmidt was born in D.C’s Columbia Hospital for Women, 87 years and 337 days after Duke Ellington. Raised on the songs and stories of WPFW’s Nap ‘Don’t Forget the Blues’ Turner, he studied jazz bass for five years with the incomparable Pepe Gonzalez, aiming to grow up as big as Howlin’ Wolf and as bad as Charles Mingus. For a half decade he walked that path until one day, hitch-hiking across Canada with three harmonicas, two spoons and a voice that could be heard over traffic, he realized his travelling life had outstripped his instrumentation. Retreating to the woods of Maine with a mandolin and a head full of ideas, he began writing the music that would become the solo project Owen and his Checkered Past.
Around the same time, down in Philadelphia, Bobby Szafranski was evolving past the guitar,
shedding strings and dropping whole steps at a time. After working his way through the low end of a couple projects, he joined the psychedelic-swagger band Mountjoy as ‘Lead Bassist and Auxiliary Whiskey-Swiller’ where he further tuned his four-stringed voice.
By 2013 Owen’s itchy feet and thirty-three year old diesel Mercedes had taken him fifty thousand miles down the road and left him in West Philly. On the way he’d added a suitcase kick drum and a whole range of musical influences from spoken word poets and anarchist punks, to blue yodelers and old-time fiddlers. Mountjoy was dissolving and Bobby was looking for a new home where he could flex his unique melodic style of bass. Owen’s rough edged mandolin and baritone growl were just the right fit and they launched into the task of rewiring Owen’s ever-expanding list of songs for a new two-person-five-instrument arrangement.
Out of this collaboration emerged Driftwood Soldier, a child with old eyes, blinking in the dim light of a barroom stage. This is not some nostalgic reproduction of an imaginary past or a feel-good celebration of a rosy future. It’s a bittersweet love song to an imperfect world, a lullaby that leaves you bleeding.
Their 2015 full length debut, Scavenger’s Joy, was a warning shot across the bows, a powerful introduction they chased up and down the East Coast, through living rooms, corner bars and back alleys. With the 2017 Blessings & Blasphemy EP the duo manage to be both unpredictable and consistent, delivering an intricate story of oppression and faith that thunders and whispers. Find Driftwood Soldier, wherever you can.
Ruth Garbus
Ruth Garbus
I first stumbled upon Ruth Garbus’ music last fall when attempting to listen to every single Vermont pop weirdo I could find. Garbus’ Rendezvous with Rama album for Autumn was one of the first records I found from this scene and I was instantly struck by the power of its ultra minimal instrumentation (just guitar and voice) in conjunction with Garbus’ lush harmonic/melodic sensibilities and bittersweetly wry lyrics. Garbus is one of the rare songwriters whose distinct style comes directly from the raw structural material of her songs as opposed to any sort of additional arrangement/production. There’s often so much going on between the lyrics and the melodic, and harmonic material of Garbus’ work that any additional instrumentation could ultimately cloud the subtle ideas present in the bare elements of her songwriting. It’s obvious that a significant amount of composition goes into each one of Garbus’ songs and perhaps her desire to achieve such formal structural clarity is why she isn’t as prolific as some of the other artists in the Brattleboro/Burlington scene. However, every single release of Garbus’ is always excellently crafted and the Joule EP is another wonderful entry in her canon.

All of Garbus’ music has an interesting implicit fascination with the recording space that her songs occupy. Where Rendezvous with Rama was full of open space and natural reverb and Ruthie’s Requests contained various bits of tape detritus, Joule EP works with a far more compressed landscape that is highlighted by the doubling of Garbus’ guitar/voice on most tracks. In some ways, this condensing of sound makes the EP seem a bit more straightforward at first but like other Vermont songwriters Chris Weisman and Zach Phillips, Garbus’ music hides complexity behind easy hooks and simple accompaniment. On Joule EP, it takes many listens to realize how truly crazy some of the chords are and similarly, Garbus’ lyrics on Joule EP contain surprisingly political messages that only begin to reveal themselves over time. Joule EP is another great example of how Garbus is creating some of the most forward looking singer-songwriter music around. by M RUBZ
Venue Information:
Chaseholm Farm
115 Chase Rd
Pine Plains, NY, 12567
http://www.cfcreamery.com/